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Whole Grain


What Are Whole Grains?

A kernel (grain) consists of three anatomical parts; bran, wheat germ and endosperm. During production of white flour, grains are broken, grounded and sivved, during which bran and wheat germ are removed, whereas whole grain flour contains all of these three parts.

Generally, grains are subjected certain processes before they are ready for consumption. Processing of grains turn them from brown to white, but also reduces their nutritional values. Whole grains contain a variety of vitamins, fiber, and antioxidants. In refined grains, on the other hand, the crust and core layers of wheat or rye are peeled off. Processing of grains leads to significant losses in vitamins, minerals, fiber and healthy phytochemicals.

For example, during the production of white flour, the removal of bran and wheat germ improves the shelf life and the bread making quality of the flour, but the nutritional value decreases because these parts are enriched more than endosperm (floury essence) in terms of protein, fiber, vitamin and minerals.

 Whole grain flour is richer in terms of nutritional value than white flour, therefore the bread made with these flours is also superior to white bread in terms of nutritional value.

A kernel (grain) consists of three anatomical parts; bran, wheat germ and endosperm. During production of white flour, grains are broken, grounded and sivved, during which bran and wheat germ are removed, whereas whole grain flour contains all of these three parts.